The Evil Within
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CATEGORIES

Survival Horror

Survival Horror

Stealth

Stealth

Puzzles

Puzzles

Third-Person Perspective

Third-Person Perspective

First-Person Perspective

First-Person Perspective

Flickering Light

Flickering Light

Dismemberment

Dismemberment

J-Horror

J-Horror

Invisible Enemy

Invisible Enemy

Hiding

Hiding

Cults

Cults

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Release date:

14 October, 2014

Genre:

Shooter

Theme:

Horror

TRAILER

SCREENSHOTS

Description

While investigating a mass murder, Detective Sebastian Castellanos descends into a gruesome, nightmarish world. This third-person survival horror game marks the debut of Tango Gameworks, a studio headed by Resident Evil progenitor Shinji Mikami. Read More

SCORES

METACRITIC

68%

HORROR LEVELS

JUMPSCARE

weighted
67%
average
71%
7 votes

Your Score

OVERALL SCARY

weighted
61%
average
61%
17 votes

Your Score

SUBMIT REVIEW

x3ph34r

JUMPSCARE

OVERALL SCARY

What begins extremely solidly soon becomes a let down. This game unfortunately has the tired stink of repetition that really leaves the player wanting more. The atmosphere is lacking from any kind of tension and often disconnects the player. The game can easily become a boring game of stealth (not to knock stealth games) as shambling creatures try to hunt you and you can just wait for them to walk away from whatever door you need to get into.

The world is extremely linear which also keeps away from truly diving into the game. There's very little area in which to explore and discover and soon becomes a gauntlet of running forward, ducking enemies until they walk away, and move forward again which is a rather huge shame because the actual mechanics of the game were nice and fun to implement.

Fighting felt good, but the game often left the player with very few moments in which fighting felt necessary. It was fun to shoot and kill things, but by the time you hid enough times to amass enough ammunition there was a feeling of overconfidence and there was no more fear to fighting. There were few situations where fight or flight felt like decisions that had to be contemplated upon and there certainly were even fewer moments where it felt like you had to make any snap judgments on what to do next.

The story itself is appealing but could have used some polish. The parts of the story that should have been twists and turns were heavily telegraphed. The story felt like it wanted to be a lot more but for whatever reason it let even itself down.

The one place where this game absolutely shined was the boss fights. The boss fights were all extremely unique and gave a lasting impression after each one. Each boss fight felt tense and gripping as you had to quickly balance fighting and observing. The bosses felt extremely original each time and playing to put them down was something that I haven't felt in a boss fight since Shadow of the Colossus. Where many games seem to follow a formula of repetition between many of their bosses, each one took the time to be fleshed out and challenging.

I can surely say that if this game was as great as the boss battles it had, it would've no doubt been one of the best games on the market. Instead what it delivered was a game that will forever be a let down that is rather surprising of Shinji Mikami.

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